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Official "Help Me Choose a Turntable" v.2.0 Thread

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Basically you want the record to be as flat and stable as possible when its being played. With a 10" platter there is an extra 1" of vinyl hanging over the edge of the platter unsupported.

 

I see what you saying. Is this "major downside" serious enough for me to consider the Essential over the iii? Also, what is your opinion of the essential?

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Hey guys--this is my first post.  Long time lurker, though  :)

 

I was wondering, has anyone ever had any experience buying an open box turntable from Turntable Labs?  I rarely buy things used, but I thought it could be a decent way to save money.  The concern I would have, of course, is that you never know how much someone used an item, or if there's a problem lurking under the surface that you just don't know about.

 

Two days ago, I emailed Turntable Labs a handful of questions, since I never ordered from them before, and they never even got back to me.  I figure that's not a good sign.

 

Also, as far as my setup goes...I got into vinyl a year ago.  I already had an old Onkyo receiver lying around (about a decade old), and purchased two Martin Logan bookshelf speakers.  I then bought the AT LP60--which I guess is like the red headed step child of the vinyl community.

 

I don't know, to me, it sounds pretty good coming through my speakers.  I think some older records, say from the 1970s, sound especially good--even better than some new ones I buy or even 180 gram.  Not sure why that is.

 

But anyway, I've tried to do a lot of research, because there's always room for improvement.  I have all but settled on the Pro-Ject Debut Carbon, based on a lot of positive reviews here and elsewhere.

 

My biggest question is this--I definitely believe in the phrase "you get what you pay for."  What I'm curious about is this though: Do you think I will really notice a significant difference between the Pro-Ject and the AT-LP60 that I have now?  In other words, ultimately, what's most important when it comes to things like sound quality and soundstage--the turntable (and by extension, the needle) that you use, or the speakers (and by extension, the amp/receiver)?

 

Do you think I'll hook it up and be like, wow, the difference in sound is akin from going from VHS to DVD?  Or is this more of a DVD to Blu-Ray jump--no question Blu is better, but depending on your TV and your DVD player and upscaling, you can make a DVD look pretty dang good.

 

Thanks guys.

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I've no experience of turntable labs so can't help you there but I'll try on the other points but I have a couple of questions.

 

Does your Onkyo have a built in phono stage or are you using the one in the AT-LP60? If it doesn't have one you will need one and if it does and it's 10 years old or so it probably won't be all that good as by then they were an afterthought in many amplifiers.

 

I have a quite high end  Onkyo AV receiver and the phono stage is piss poor.

 

When you say Receiver is it a multichannel AV receiver or a normal 2 channel stereo one?

 

The differences and pro's and con's of the two and also a normal integrated amplifier have been explained to death on this board but simply and very generally:

 

An AV receiver is more for video and music is a compromise and not as good as a stereo receiver

A stereo receiver is not as good as an integrated amplifier

 

As I say that is very general as are most rules in hifi and this is explained in depth elsewhere on this board.

 

Yes the AT-LP60 is cack but not quite as cack as a Crosley, it will do a job but in the same way that a Yugo or a Lada does a job.

 

The Project is a light and day improvement over the AT-LP60 for many reasons but it does depend on a lot of factors as to whether you hear all that improvement

 

With hifi what you are striving for is equipment that is of a similar quality, a really good component in a generally poor system will not give it's best and a really bad component in a good system will drag the rest down. It can be a very frustrating exercise.

 

Also very if not the most important thing is setup, if a superb system is badly placed and set up it will struggle to sound half decent but an average system well set up will sound more than half decent. So with hifi you can buy your way to a nice sound or you can reserch your way to it.

 

One caveat I will make though is that I hear people complain about their Projects and it usually turns out that the cartridge was not correctly placed when it leaves the factory, setup again.

 

So in summary you need to know the type and quality of your amplifer/phono stage and your speakers, what you are connecting them with and how well placed and set up it all is. You should hear quite a big improvement from the Project but only if the rest of the equipment lets it through.

 

As to your 70's LP's sounding better this will be because this is when the art of vinyl production was at it's height, they are guaranteed to be from an all analogue source, not touch anything digital all through the production process and finding people who know how to master to vinyl was a lot easier. This quality is still out there but only with dedication from a select few.

 

Hopefully that answers some of your questions and doesn't raise too many more.

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Repress--thanks a ton for responding.

 

As for my Onkyo, it is actually the Onkyo HTR520.  I bought it a decade ago because I wanted good surround sound for watching movies. So yes, you're right, it's a multi AV receiver.

 

As for how I have the AT-LP60 hooked up to my Onkyo receiver--I have done it both ways.  Meaning, I have plugged it both into the PHONO terminal, as well as a AUX or simply VIDEO in (only using the audio ports for the RCA cables).  This receiver also has a subwoofer which is decent--I mean, I don't need it to rock the house or anything.  It's subtle but there.

 

So to be clear, you say a stereo receiver is not as good as an intergrated amp.  What would be the reason one would choose a stereo receiver over an amp then?  And if I were to buy an integrated amp, what are the things I would most want to look for (aside from the phono input)?

 

Thanks.

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Repress--thanks a ton for responding.

 

As for my Onkyo, it is actually the Onkyo HTR520.  I bought it a decade ago because I wanted good surround sound for watching movies. So yes, you're right, it's a multi AV receiver.

 

As for how I have the AT-LP60 hooked up to my Onkyo receiver--I have done it both ways.  Meaning, I have plugged it both into the PHONO terminal, as well as a AUX or simply VIDEO in (only using the audio ports for the RCA cables).  This receiver also has a subwoofer which is decent--I mean, I don't need it to rock the house or anything.  It's subtle but there.

 

So to be clear, you say a stereo receiver is not as good as an intergrated amp.  What would be the reason one would choose a stereo receiver over an amp then?  And if I were to buy an integrated amp, what are the things I would most want to look for (aside from the phono input)?

 

Thanks.

 

You should read this.

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I've seen people say "don't buy the AT LP-60" yet I have seen many others who have said they love it and have not had any problems with it. So what's the deal?

I couldn't afford the LP120 personally, I am young here and don't have a high salaried job. I have the AT LP60(usb) and I haven't had a single problem, and neither has anyone else I know with it. 

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I've seen people say "don't buy the AT LP-60" yet I have seen many others who have said they love it and have not had any problems with it. So what's the deal?

I couldn't afford the LP120 personally, I am young here and don't have a high salaried job. I have the AT LP60(usb) and I haven't had a single problem, and neither has anyone else I know with it.

You might not have a problem with it, but I'm sure your records do.

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I've seen people say "don't buy the AT LP-60" yet I have seen many others who have said they love it and have not had any problems with it. So what's the deal?

I couldn't afford the LP120 personally, I am young here and don't have a high salaried job. I have the AT LP60(usb) and I haven't had a single problem, and neither has anyone else I know with it. 

 

i don't suppose anyone wants to write it all again so read this 

 

http://boards.vinylcollective.com/topic/88504-dont-buy-a-crosley-ever-beginner%E2%80%99s-guide-to-hi%E2%80%93fi/page-28

 

Lots about the AT60 is covered there

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I've been using a record player that was given to me a few years back and it's time to upgrade. I have a budget of around $250 and have been debating between the Audio-Technica AT-LP120 and Music Halls USB 1. They seem pretty similar. Is one better than the other? What's different between the two? Or is there something better in that price range?

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I've been using a record player that was given to me a few years back and it's time to upgrade. I have a budget of around $250 and have been debating between the Audio-Technica AT-LP120 and Music Halls USB 1. They seem pretty similar. Is one better than the other? What's different between the two? Or is there something better in that price range?

 

What are you upgrading from?

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I've been using a record player that was given to me a few years back and it's time to upgrade. I have a budget of around $250 and have been debating between the Audio-Technica AT-LP120 and Music Halls USB 1. They seem pretty similar. Is one better than the other? What's different between the two? Or is there something better in that price range?

 

I'm sure Allen will be able to provide you with some better guidance on upgrading once you list your current table, but in your price range I just want to make sure you at least consider the U-Turn Orbit if you haven't already. 

 

Lot's of discussion about it here http://boards.vinylcollective.com/topic/78600-150-audiophile-turntable-this-could-be-interesting/

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I've been using a record player that was given to me a few years back and it's time to upgrade. I have a budget of around $250 and have been debating between the Audio-Technica AT-LP120 and Music Halls USB 1. They seem pretty similar. Is one better than the other? What's different between the two? Or is there something better in that price range?

Denon DP-300F

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Apologies for digging up a dead thread here, but I've been away from the hobby for a while now and have a couple questions. When I walked away from the hobby (I was out of work for a long time and couldn't afford it) I had just started putting together my first sound system. Nothing super high-end or audiophile quality, but something that I'm hoping is a significant upgrade from the Crosley I have now and refuse to keep using:

- TC-750 Professional Moving Magnet Preamp
- Nad C352 Stereo Integrated Amplifier
- Monitor Audio Radius 90 Speakers / AKG Q701 Headphones

Obviously all I'm missing is the turntable itself. Back then I had my eyes on a turntable that was pre-fitted with a 2M Red and it came to something like $700-$800 but now I see you can get the Denon DP-300F (with the standard cartridge) for just about $230 at Best Buy (my best friend also works there so I could use his discount to get it for even less!) and similar sites. Could anybody tell me if this is a record player that would be compatible with the setup I've outlined above? Sorry if this all seems a bit ignorant but I was new to all of this when I had to take a break from it so it's kind of like I'm relearning everything. Is there anything else that I would need to make this all work together besides speaker wire?

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I ran a DP300F for a couple years and it was flawless from day 1. We upgraded the cheapo cart to a Shure M97xe and it was a huge sound improvement.

I loved it, in fact I still own it. I couldn't bring myself to sell it because it was so reliable and sounded so good. 

I had it running through 

LoungeAudio phono preamp

Carver CT-27v preamp

Carver AV-505 amp

Klipsch RF-15 towers and Klipsch KSW10 sub

 

I would always highly recommend it as a budget table. Of course you'll need to upgrade that cheapo white AT cartridge. Many people (myself included) went with the Shure I mentioned above. It's a great match. Make sure to shut the internal preamp off on the Denon before wiring up your phono pre. (the switch is under the platter)

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