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to unseal, or not to unseal? that is the question!


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hi guys, first time here.
I've got a mint (factory shrink-wrapped, unopened) copy of Decca's 1969 release of The Who's "Tommy". Only thing is, I can't get the pressing data off of the records with out opening the package? And, of course, I can't inspect the condition of the records?

So, do I open the package, get the info and reduce the price to "near mint"?

Or do I leave it sealed - mint - and offer it "as is - no returns"  to collectors?

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8 minutes ago, Derek™ said:

Few things make me more proud than seeing the community band together to enlighten someone that records should be opened if they're going to be played, and sealed if they're intended to sell. 🥹 You came to the right place.

I’ve been doing it the other way around and it seems to work just as well. 

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Here's the thing, if you don't open it, you don't actually know anything about the state of the record. Sure its sealed. But so what? The record could still be pressed off centre due to a mistake at the pressing plant. The wrong music could have been recorded onto the disc. It could have two A sides or two B sides. There could be residue stuck to the disc that no one noticed before they put it in the sleeve and sealed it with the shrink wrap. Sealed doesn't necessarily mean "mint". 

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38 minutes ago, Han Solo said:

Here's the thing, if you don't open it, you don't actually know anything about the state of the record. Sure its sealed. But so what? The record could still be pressed off centre due to a mistake at the pressing plant. The wrong music could have been recorded onto the disc. It could have two A sides or two B sides. There could be residue stuck to the disc that no one noticed before they put it in the sleeve and sealed it with the shrink wrap. Sealed doesn't necessarily mean "mint". 

Yup. The listing definitely would need to indicate that the album is "presumed mint" and no returns/refunds. But still expect to have issues with the seller (bad feedback, probable PayPal dispute) if they chose to open it, and there is an issue. Especially if you list it as one pressing based off the limited information you have from the outer sleeve, and it turns out to be a different pressing entirely. With these mass produced major label releases from the 60s-80s, it can sometimes be incredibly difficult to determine the exact pressing with the outer info alone, and you need to verify matrix numbers, center label designs, etc to really be sure.

Also, I don't know if this has been debunked as finicky vinyl dude pseudo-science yet, but wasn't the general consensus that decades in shrink poses concerns serious for warping?

 

 

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5 hours ago, mitchard said:

Also, I don't know if this has been debunked as finicky vinyl dude pseudo-science yet, but wasn't the general consensus that decades in shrink poses concerns serious for warping?

 

 

It depends on the shrink. There’s more than one kind used, and the more “plastic wrap” kind definitely gets snug around the corners over time and starts bowing the jacket, especially on single LP or non-gatefold releases. 

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