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Found 6 results

  1. Only the one-sheet is available through Secretly Canadian right now; also mentions limited-edition colored vinyl run of 500. On vinyl for the first time. http://www.secretlydistribution.com/resources/trr246.pdf
  2. Glen Hansard (The Swell Season, The Frames) is releasing a tribute EP to a friend, Jason Molina, titled It Was Triumph We Once Proposed. Molina of course was part of Songs: Ohia, among other projects. The EP is being released on 12″ vinyl, now up for pre-order. http://www.glenhansardmusic.com/songofgoodhope/?page_id=933
  3. 19.99 + shipping here: http://www.scdistribution.com/release.html?catalog=SC299&class=title Didn't It Rain is Jason Molina's first perfect record. Recorded live in a single room, with no overdubs and musicians creating their parts on the fly, the overall approach to the recording was nothing new for Molina. But something in the air and execution of Didn't It Rain clearly sets it apart from his existing body of work. His albums had always been full of space, but never had Molina sculpted the space as masterfully as he does on Didn't It Rain. Perhaps it is that Molina entered the session with fully written songs that allowed this emboldened confidence in chance. The creaks and scraping of strings are all part of the Didn't It Rain choir. So when Molina hoots for another chorus during the album's eponymous opening gambit, it feels less an off-the-cuff call, and more an essential piece of the tone and structure. Midway through the same song, that which takes its name from a traditional piece popularized by Mahalia Jackson, we hear the long, low woosh of a passing bus. Distant traffic has forever been a trope of lo-fi, but here, it is a pristine woosh. The highest of fidelity and sure of purpose. The same can be said for Molina's always remarkable voice, here settling into a matured, assured, and subtly lowered tenor. It all adds up to something near in mood to Neil Young's song "On The Beach," and maybe even Boz Scagg's 1969 self-titled album laid to tape at the legendary Muscle Shoals studio. Didn't It Rain is an ode to the Midwest Rust Belt under which Molina was born and Molina's newfound Chicago home. When we move to a new place, we must truly confront all our own weaknesses and strengths, and Molina puts that all on the table with this one. The album's triple-threat center pieces come by way of "Ring The Bell," "Cross The Road, Molina," and "Blue Factory Flame." Strung together, they present clearly Molina's specific set of mythological symbols that had been forming on previous recordings. It is as heady a middle section as I can recall. But the journey across these three songs -- with their circling serpents, their neon-flame wreathed moons, their swinging blades, their debilitating emptiness -- also feels like a cleansing, a catharsis, a sort of primal therapy. While demo'd and recorded months before the events of 9/11, Didn't It Rain does seem to somehow consider the mood of the time. It's surely an album about setting roots, but it also offers a moment of solace in a time of overwhelming uncertainty. Here, Molina's now well-known battle with depression aligns with an entire nation's moment of depression. While even more cryptic and spartan, Didn't It Rain's imagery and themes can be poetically linked to another 2002 Chicago-rooted album that tapped into the post-9/11 psyche, Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. This expanded reissue presents Molina's home demos of the record, eight previously unreleased tracks, complete with a distant playground full of children chiming in the background for a few songs. The glorious juxtaposition of Molina's songs' desolation and the blissful playing of children is about as haunting as it gets, friends. TRACKSDidn't It Rain Steve Albini's Blues Ring The Bell Cross The Road, Molina Blue Factory Flame Two Blue Lights Blue Chicago Moon Didn't It Rain Ring The Bell- Working Title: Depression No. 42 Cross The Road, Molina- Working Title: Chicago City Moon Blue Factory Flame Two Blue Lights Blue Chicago Moon The Gray Tour- Working Title: Waiting It's Whole Life (Later Re-Recorded for The Gray Tower 7") Spectral Alphabet (Later Re-Recorded for Pyramid Electric Co.)
  4. http://www.ccnow.com/cgi-local/sc_cart.cgi?7125431131615633 From Spin: A gem from the late Jason Molina's back-catalog will soon see the light once again. On August 27, Misra Records will re-release Hello Future Tinglies, the 1991 album from Spineriders, a Lorian, Ohio punk band that featured Molina on bass and back-up vocals. "Our aim in unearthing Hello Future Tinglies is to provide an invaluable window into the life, circumstances and experiences of a young Northeast Ohio native whose extraordinary gift would grow, take form and awaken the world in innumerable ways," the label explains. The upcoming reissue will only be available on cassette and pressing will be limited to just 300 copies — "an effort to stay true to the times," according to Misra. These times? Or those times? Pre-orders are currently available through Misra's online store. All proceeds will benefit the Musicians Emergency Medical Association, a non-profit organization that aims to "stabilize and improve the quality of life of people in the entertainment industry" by providing health care aid. Aquabear Legion, an artist collective based in Athens, Ohio, is also helping with the release effort. For a quick preview of Hello Future Tinglies, stream the spindly "Instrumental 2" below. Todd Jacobs, guitarist for Spineriders and founding member of Molina's Songs: Ohia project, has set up an online memorial via an official Spineriders website. The old band's drummer Carl Raponi, meanwhile, has produced a limited run of 40 Jason Molina screen-prints which are also available through Misra Records. Molina died in March of natural causes. He was 39 years old. Since his tragic passing, fans have had the small comfort of a series of Songs: Ohia reissues and a tribute album titled Weary Engine Blues featuring Mark Kozelek, Will Oldham, Phil Elverum, and Scout Niblett. Band of Horses also honored the Magnolia Electric Co. mastermind on Jimmy Kimmel Live! with a cover of "I've Been Riding With the Ghost."
  5. Secretly Canadian is proud to announce the 15th Anniversary reissue of a Songs: Ohia classic, the Hecla & Griper EP, now appearing for the first time on vinyl with previously unreleased bonus material. After spending the summer of 1997 on the road, Jason Molina and Co. headed into Bloomington, Ind. studio The Grotto with producer Dan Burton and layed down these eight songs. Odes to the love of loss and reggae friends. If you have ever found the other pillow empty in the morning,this is what you need to dry your tears. It also features a Conway Twitty cover. This vinyl reissue contains two previously unreleased Songs: Ohia tracks ("Debts" and "Pilot & Friend") and alternative versions of two songs that would later appear on Songs: Ohia's Impala ("Hearts Newly Arrived (Hecla Session)" and "One of Those Uncertain Hands (Hecla Session).” The pre-order isn't up at Secretly Canadian yet, but it is up at various other outlets. Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Hecla-Griper-Songs-Ohia/dp/B00BNWWY94/ Insound: http://www.insound.com/Hecla-and-Griper-15th-Anniversary-Edition-Vinyl-LP-SongsOhia/P/INS117539/
  6. As many of you know Jason Molina passed away on the 16th and Graveface and William Schaff are putting together a tribute cd and limited print to celebrate his art and life and raise some money to help support Jason's family during these tough times (no matter how big of a fan any of us were know that he meant infinitely more to them...) http://www.graveface.com/graveface-catalog.html Sad times...