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Right now my setup is a Technics 1200MK2 ->DJM600 Mixer -> Guitar Amp (Please don't even comment on this I know it's complete shit but I don't have anything better right now) If you're wondering how I even have any of the other equipment and not speakers I'll tell you I inherited it from my mother who spent alot of money on her DJ-ing hobby. 

 

Anyways my question is, how reliable is any audio equipment from a thrift store? Let me know if you got any good finds from one. Or your experiences otherwise.

 

Also, let's say I were able to spend more money on equipment, what would you suggest running it through? 

i.e. preamps and speakers 

 

Thanks guys. 

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Did I do something wrong?

 

Not sure how you could expect a reasonable answer.  How could anybody comment on the reliability of thrift store audio gear short of just making up some bullshit?

 

If you want an actual answer, first read (homework) and then specify a budget of some sort.

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Don't listen to these guys.  99% of all thrift store equipment is serviced by a team of highly trained elves with degrees in electrical engineering and audio design. However, because they're mythical beings, they don't require monetary compensation, which allows Goodwill and Salvation Army to keep prices on gear quite low.

 

Of course, this is all a fairly well-guarded secret and there's a good chance I'll be kicked out of the Super-Exclusive Thrift Store Audio Buyers Club for opening my mouth, but it's a risk that I'm willing to take.  Power to the people!

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Not sure how you could expect a reasonable answer.  How could anybody comment on the reliability of thrift store audio gear short of just making up some bullshit?

 

If you want an actual answer, first read (homework) and then specify a budget of some sort.

 

Don't listen to these guys.  99% of all thrift store equipment is serviced by a team of highly trained elves with degrees in electrical engineering and audio design. However, because they're mythical beings, they don't require monetary compensation, which allows Goodwill and Salvation Army to keep prices on gear quite low.

 

Of course, this is all a fairly well-guarded secret and there's a good chance I'll be kicked out of the Super-Exclusive Thrift Store Audio Buyers Club for opening my mouth, but it's a risk that I'm willing to take.  Power to the people!

 

I swear there's no point in ever asking anything. It's a troll farm. All I am asking is if anyone has had good experiences with getting something from a thrift store in terms of equipment. Or if they have not. And in regards to buying new equipment, it's already a hypothetical question so there is no budget, I'm just asking what one would suggest.

 

If you don't have anything to contribute but Ray J gifs than thanks you're really helpful and I'm glad you took your time to assist in my needs. 

 

And I did my homework, but I don't have the ability to go and test out every single preamp or speaker set-up which is why I'm asking VC.

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Every thrift store in every city in every state is going to have different equipment, it's impossible for anyone to answer your question. If you went to a thrift store and looked at what they had, then asked is "x" or "y" good, you'd be able to get a real answer. 

 

I will repeat myself again, I'm just asking if anyone has had good experiences or not, because if say 5 people say yes, the equipment functions and was good, I can be assured that hey, not all thrift store equipment is garbage. That it is a feasible place to find things. 

 

But I will stop by Salvation Army today and take a look at the brands and stuff thanks. 

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pmd ignore these pricks who can't read, down vote me all you want but the guy was asking a simple broad question and half of you decide to be ass holes, why even come here if thats all you have to offer, theres plenty of threads for you to contribute to without bashing a guy

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I swear there's no point in ever asking anything. It's a troll farm. 

 

No, no, no ... the Troll Farm is where they field complaints and grievances from those who are unsatisfied with their thrift store purchases.  Trolls get a bad rap, but they're really quite adept at customer service.

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pmd ignore these pricks who can't read, down vote me all you want but the guy was asking a simple broad question and half of you decide to be ass holes, why even come here if thats all you have to offer, theres plenty of threads for you to contribute to without bashing a guy

 

Thanks man, I appreciate the help!

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I scored a used tube console stereo that I restored.  It worked when I bought it at my local thrift store but required some extensive work both inside and out before I was willing to have it in the house.  Here is the thread I started if anyone is interested:  http://boards.vinylcollective.com/topic/92751-thrift-store-find/?hl=%2Bthrift+%2Bstore

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To be honest, thrift store gear is a coin flip. Which (kinda almost) explains a few of the responses here.

You can check most things out. As in, plug them in and see if they power up. But without an actual thorough going over, you are essentially gambling with $10.

In my opinion, before you even try and turn anything on. Pick it up. Does it FEEL heavy. If it feels heavy, then it's worth trying out. That goes for every part of any system you're trying to put together.

Next is does it work. This can be very tough at a thrift store, but almost everyone is working for free, and have nothing else to do. Try to test things as best as possible,

At the end of the day, even if you buy a bunch of different products. And some don't work, put then on Craig's list for what you paid. As I said, it's a gamble.

And make no mistake about this. You can absolutely pick up fantastic vintage gear for a fraction of the price if new stuff. And you can absolutely save hundreds and have a very nice setup. You just have to sift through the junk.

Good luck!

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To be honest, thrift store gear is a coin flip. Which (kinda almost) explains a few of the responses here.

You can check most things out. As in, plug them in and see if they power up. But without an actual thorough going over, you are essentially gambling with $10.

In my opinion, before you even try and turn anything on. Pick it up. Does it FEEL heavy. If it feels heavy, then it's worth trying out. That goes for every part of any system you're trying to put together.

Next is does it work. This can be very tough at a thrift store, but almost everyone is working for free, and have nothing else to do. Try to test things as best as possible,

At the end of the day, even if you buy a bunch of different products. And some don't work, put then on Craig's list for what you paid. As I said, it's a gamble.

And make no mistake about this. You can absolutely pick up fantastic vintage gear for a fraction of the price if new stuff. And you can absolutely save hundreds and have a very nice setup. You just have to sift through the junk.

Good luck!

Exactly what he said

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I found a couple RCA speakers, older ones, and a Kenwood 7-piece set. The Kenwood was $100. Also 2 Panasonics. All about knee high. Not sure what else info I can give you. 

 

For speakers at least for the Panasonics you can usually fairly easily take the front grills off, and then inspect the cones to see if there is damage or dry rot.  There are kits to re-cone speakers, but that all depends on if you're comfortable.  I'd say a smart thing to do is write down what you see with model numbers, or if you have a smart phone just look it up there.  But usually you can find some information on whether or not the stuff is good to begin with and would be worth investing anytime and effort to repair.  I've not personally bought any equipment at the Thrift Store but I did look through a bunch of thrift stores and did this to determine whether or not to drop any cash on things.  Ultimately I didn't really find anything of worth in my searches, but maybe you'd have better luck as others definitely have. 

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I picked up my tape deck at Goodwill for like $10. I brought my headphones and grabbed a store tape to test it out. I went through two decks before landing on the one I bought.

Also, don't let the dipshits get to you, they think this board matters or something.

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I've had nothing but good experiences with thrift shops and electronics. Luckily the ones near me let you hook stuff up and test things out before you walk out.

I bought an onkyo receiver, a sony record player, tape deck and a decent set of pioneer speakers when I was helping my nephew set up his budget system over the course of a month and it sounds pretty good all for around $55 bucks total.

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Not really a thrift store but near where my parents are in the US there is an antiques mall that I have picked up a few bits at. Antique is a bit of a hopeful title to be honest but fun to look around anyway.

 

Last big thing I bought was an a direct drive Optonica RP-3636 turntable with a man made plinth that looks like granite and weighs like it is granite. Cost me $40 to buy and another $50 to get it back home to England on the plane, it took some getting home as well because the limit was 50lb's and packed it was 52, so it took a little charm to get it through. I still have it and still use it.

 

It worked well enough but I have since rebuilt the electronics and re wired the arm with better wire and it's now a real giant killer.

 

Over here though I always look around the 2nd hand shops, one man's junk etc. You just need to be prepared to get your fingers burnt every now and then and it helps if you are technical.

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I don't have any experience with purchasing equipment from thrift stores. It's not for lack of trying.. the local ones just never have anything. Mostly I just wanted to say that I'm glad you asked the question and, after the few couple of knucklehead responses from the "pros", I'm glad you started to get the answers you were looking for. I think the community benefits as a whole when questions are asked and respect is given to the questioners.. especially when no disrespect was given by the questioner in the first place. The internet can be a bummer sometimes. But this thread has helped me as well because this has been a question I had been wondering as well, so thank you

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