flood

we've hit critical mass: United isn't accepting new customers for the time being

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I think the only part of the vinyl craze getting out of hand is all the crazy color combinations the plants keep trying to do. The more whacky colored vinyl I see, the more I want a plain black variant available.

 

Honestly, if labels/artists didn't want such elaborate color schemes, production would probably go much faster.

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I think the only part of the vinyl craze getting out of hand is all the crazy color combinations the plants keep trying to do. The more whacky colored vinyl I see, the more I want a plain black variant available.

 

Honestly, if labels/artists didn't want such elaborate color schemes, production would probably go much faster.

yes and DOWN WITH PICTURE DISCS

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Honestly, if labels/artists didn't want such elaborate color schemes, production would probably go much faster.

 

That's probably true. Most of those color effects need to be done on a hand-operated press, rather than the big automatic presses, which are a lot faster. 

 

There's still a lot of plants out there to work with despite this. I pressed my first record with them though, and it was a great experience. That was 2007, and now I use plants in California because I can go pick them up. Plants are pretty slammed all over at the moment.

 

Also, because this is fun to think about:

My parents are baby-boomers, but they traded out their records for CD's and tapes. I was born in 86. Didn't know records were a thing until I saw them in a movie. Seeing them in a movie made me want to seek them out, so I started collecting around 1999 when I found some neat 45s (Nirvana, blink 182 "lemmings" on yellow and Foo Fighters "Big Me" on red) at our local record shop in San Diego. Then I got a cheap radio shack turntable for my birthday that year.

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some people don't want to be anything more than casual fans of vinyl. if people want crosleys and Katy Perry vinyl that's their own business.

 

hopefully when the bubble bursts we can all get some cool records for cheap

 

I actually don't really even have a problem with e.g. Katy Perry records because at least that's a current artist. We've reached the point where truly marginal albums are getting reissued (a lot of early-to-mid 90s stuff that probably weren't pressed in the first place and I mean seriously even if they had a vinyl pressing back in the day they don't need to be pressed now). Even stuff that's getting repressed lately of bands that I actually like sort of annoys me; this came up last week when the Mercury-era Rush reissues got announced and I think it's stupid because you can find all of those records by going to a few used record shops. Meanwhile indie labels and unsigned bands who want to do a DIY press get squeezed out because... that obnoxious Sublime record is getting pressed for some reason? ugh.

 

URP not taking orders from new customers only squeezes out those indie labels/bands that honestly kept those plants from closing for the last 20 years, whereas the majors can press all the Spin Doctors and I Mother Earth reissues they want because they're "existing customers". *jerk-off motion*

 

 

Just out of curiosity, how many of You guys and gals have parents that are baby boomers as opposed to generation X'rs?

 

My mom and my stepdad are both on the cusp, 1959 and 1961. My mom is probably a little more tied in with Boomers because she's the last of 9 siblings and obviously the rest of them were born firmly in the Boomer sphere. My stepdad, even though he's older than my mom, is probably more aligned with GenX because he was the oldest of three. Neither of them really acts like a "traditional" Boomer or GenXer anyway, sort of like how I fall on the cusp of GenX/GenY and I don't really relate with most of the the normally-ascribed attributes of either.

 

As this pertains to records, I grew up with them from when I was very little (the first music I specifically remember was the debut album of this local band called the Violent Femmes that my mom was super excited about), even if a lot of the time we recorded the records onto cassettes and listened to those because you could listen to them anywhere (car, boombox, whatever) and also it saved wear and tear on the record itself. My mom and I got away from them because we spent 6-7 years moving a LOT and also being broke as shit so all the new music I got for a long time was dubbed from friends' tapes. But my stepdad had a bit of a vinyl collection so when my mom met him it was pretty normal and I started buying my own once in a while. This coincided with the explosion of CDs as THE mass market media so there weren't a whole lot of records being sold at the time, and also CDs were the "cool new thing".

 

As an aside, breaking up "generations" into 20-year blocks is just too long in my opinion. I mean, GenY is getting defined as roughly people born starting with the early 1980s up to 2000 or so. What the shit does a 34 year old today have in common with a 14 year old? Aside from being human, almost nothing. 

AlexH. and davey like this

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I don't think there is any one label, or any one type of record that is to blame for any of this. Stopping production of picture discs or saying no to splatters will ease some congestion, but  production is just gonna get filled by something else. Demand is huge there's really nothing you can do about it. Except stop taking on new customers.

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At this point any established label should have a pressing planet that they have a relationship with it. I dont see this being a problem unless you want to press 100 records of your best frieds band to sell at VFW shows

Yeah, that is what sucks about it.

That is pretty much how every good label in the history of music started.

AlexH. likes this

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